Radio

Something Understood

“Each episode has always surprised, amazed and even challenged me. I think it is a sublime series” - a listener.
Programme Details

A series about the thoughtful moments in life.

Part of the BBC’s ethical and religious output, Something Understood is a moment of contemplation, a place where listeners are invited to think in a different way about the world. Presenters choose music, poetry and prose to reflect on a theme significant to them – something in life that is puzzling,  an unexplained thought or gesture – a spiritual challenge. These are programmes that stimulate, maybe confound, but are always a joy to listen to – reaching an audience of 880, 000 listeners every week.

Sir Mark Tully, former BBC correspondent and writer on India, is the original and principal presenter. Others have included Stewart Henderson, Anita Rani, Vesna Goldsworthy, Hazhir Teimourian, Paul Bakibinga, Peter King and Choman Hardi. .

Loftus produces eight programmes a year. A further twelve programmes are made by Falling Tree Productions. Something Understood was devised and is still mainly produced by Unique the Production Company.

Award

In 2010, Mark Tully’s “Something Understood: Hospitality”, produced by Elizabeth Burke, won a merit in the prestigious Sandford St Martin Trust Religious Radio Awards.

Production Credits

Produced by Jo Coombs, Kim Normanton, Elizabeth Burke, Hannah Marshall and Frances Beere

Research from Frances Beere, Mair Bosworth, Eva Krysiak, Hannah Marshall, David Owen Norris, Ted Tregear, Soosan Lolavar, Catherine Coombs and Harvey McCabe

Executive producers Olivia Seligman, Jo Coombs and Elizabeth Burke

More about ‘Something Understood’ on the BBC

Media

Elizabeth Burke receives a Sandford St Martin Trust Award

Nigel Acheson recording in India with Mark Tully

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Celebrating the sensory power of true darkness.
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Life in a Roman Catholic Seminary, past and present.
New Life, New Views
Children help us to see things in a more positive light.
Starting Over
Journalist Paul Bakibinga on life after a major setback.